WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Vanguard Spirit Plus Binoculars

Speed to First Woot:
13m 26.771s
First Sucker:
dringrn
Last Wooter to Woot:
cuttie31
Last Purchase:
2 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 35% of Sport Woots
Bottom 41% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 17% of Sport Woots
Top 43% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 9% first woot
  • 2% second woot
  • 24% < 10 woots
  • 25% < 25 woots
  • 40% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 7% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 11% one year old
  • 82% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 92% bought 1
  • 5% bought 2
  • 3% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

6%
2%
2%
2%
2%
1%
9%
6%
8%
9%
5%
9%
6%
5%
2%
6%
3%
2%
3%
2%
1%
1%
5%
1%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


CowboyDann


quality posts: 716 Private Messages CowboyDann

Don't forget to mail in your rebate if you buy this!!


Here is a video on the spirit plus line from vanguard

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 565 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff






Ok, here we go with a few facts for later.

1) You will not get a rebate form in the box. You must print it yourself from the link provided.

So, when you come back here in a few weeks to ask where to find the rebate form, remember: It's always available from the sale page which you can get to from the product name link in the first post of this thread or just click here. I suggest bookmarking it now to make it easier.

2) You will not get a receipt in the box. Go to Stuff You Bought and print your order detail page as a receipt.

3) Read everything twice, fill everything out, read it again, check everything, make copies of it all, THEN and only then, seal the envelope. Almost all rebates have very exacting instructions and it's easy to forget something.

4) Wait. Rebates take a very long time to process. They are done by companies (not the manufacturer) and this isn't the only rebate campaign they're working on.



FORUM MODERATOR
To contact Customer Service, use the SUPPORT form at the top of every woot page
••• ► Woot's Return Policy ◄ ••• ► Did you check your spam/junk folders for a CS reply?
CANCEL?? How to cancel your order in the first 15 minutes!! - except Woot-Offs & expedited orders

CowboyDann


quality posts: 716 Private Messages CowboyDann
ThunderThighs wrote:


Ok, here we go with a few facts for later....



haha well you just blew my post out of the water

slotter


quality posts: 3 Private Messages slotter

Reviews on Amazon...

http://www.amazon.com/Vanguard-Spirit-Plus-Binocular-Choose/product-reviews/B004VXR8XE

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 565 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

CowboyDann wrote:haha well you just blew my post out of the water

Reworked my posts from previous rebate sales. I know the drill.



FORUM MODERATOR
To contact Customer Service, use the SUPPORT form at the top of every woot page
••• ► Woot's Return Policy ◄ ••• ► Did you check your spam/junk folders for a CS reply?
CANCEL?? How to cancel your order in the first 15 minutes!! - except Woot-Offs & expedited orders

doomtothee


quality posts: 48 Private Messages doomtothee

This would make a great gift bundle for the teenagers,

Woot won't let me have a cool signature

pinchecat


quality posts: 20 Private Messages pinchecat

i don't know shít about binoculars. tell me, wooters, which option would be best for large sporting events (cfb/nfl)?

mschauber


quality posts: 40 Private Messages mschauber

Similar to @pinchecats question, could someone explain what the benefits of the different models are?

I'm used photography equipment, so a translation of binocular #'s into standard glass terms would be greatly appreciated. Or just actual distance these can be used for.

I appreciate the help/lesson.

--
Hey you, out there in the cold; Getting lonely, getting old; Can you feel me? - Pink Floyd/Roger Waters
My CT

pr0gr4m


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pr0gr4m

The first number is the magnification, so binoculars that are, for example 10x42 will magnify things 10 times their normal size.

The second number is the size, in millimeters, of the objective (front) lens. A larger lens lets in more light making images seen through the binoculars brighter.

sosuemesdc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sosuemesdc

anyone have any idea whether the rebate is limited to one unit? Typically rebates say a maximum or something like "only good for ___" but I dont see that here and this deal runs out before the company opens on monday so I cant ask..

riverdemon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages riverdemon

Here is the best real world advice I can offer.

10x42 are going to be the largest, but they will let in the most light and get you the "closest" to what you are looking at. They hard be hard to keep steady though. I use this magnification at work watching birds on the beach, they work well there but there is a lot of light; when it is bright they are great.

8x42 are going to give you the same magnification as the 10x42, but they let in a little less light, so the image won't be as bright. They are easier to keep steady though. They are a good all around range though, and work well in the woods, backyard, etc. This is the type I own (not the vanguard, different company).

8x32 are the smallest, and have the smallest "zoom". They should have the largest field of view though, which means they will have the biggest viewing area.

Hmmmmm


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Hmmmmm

Umm. How much is the rebate? Is that the deal here?

oldolds442


quality posts: 0 Private Messages oldolds442

i have been looking for a good set of binos the last few days, and was going to buy a set of steiner military/marine. as luck would have it, i looked at woot sport today, and here you go. the reviews were too good for these, and at about half the price. had to pull the trigger on a set of 8x42's. already printed out the receipt, and rebate form. really, a pretty good deal!!

oldolds442

oldolds442


quality posts: 0 Private Messages oldolds442

btw, the link for the rebate form is iin the first post. it is for $25..

oldolds442

slickk23


quality posts: 0 Private Messages slickk23

Actually the magnification in the 8x42 is less than the 10x42, but they should have equal brightness.




riverdemon wrote:Here is the best real world advice I can offer.

10x42 are going to be the largest, but they will let in the most light and get you the "closest" to what you are looking at. They hard be hard to keep steady though. I use this magnification at work watching birds on the beach, they work well there but there is a lot of light; when it is bright they are great.

8x42 are going to give you the same magnification as the 10x42, but they let in a little less light, so the image won't be as bright. They are easier to keep steady though. They are a good all around range though, and work well in the woods, backyard, etc. This is the type I own (not the vanguard, different company).

8x32 are the smallest, and have the smallest "zoom". They should have the largest field of view though, which means they will have the biggest viewing area.



charliecarroll


quality posts: 105 Private Messages charliecarroll

Does country of origin have anything to do with quality?

First, at this price point, this is not a bad deal at all, all things considered.

I was curious so I googled, "Vanguard Spirit Plus Binoculars country of origin" and what I found was these are made in China. When buying it should be known that the quality of optics from China are not up to Japanese standards. Nor are optics from Korea and/or any other far east country. The best optics are from Japan and Germany with German optics almost always being the highest priced.

Long term camera buffs that visit Woot (and it seems there are quite a few) can attest to the fact that one of the most used "bait and switch' tactics of unscrupulous camera dealers (that almost all sell other optics as well) would advertise and offer a well known brand name at a ridiculously low price. When you called them to place an order you were told, "sorry we have sold out but we have another brand that retails for more and is better and we will let you have it for the same lower price!" How nice. No, not nice. You were baited and you called. They made the offer and if you said yes, the switch had been made. When you received your new lens, binoculars, etc., you looked and there was the surprise. Made in Korea or made in China.

Again, this is not to say this offer is a bad deal as long as you are aware the optical quality is not going to be what a good set of binoculars (same or similar specs) from a Japanese manufacturer are going to be. You will none the less pay a little more but you will be getting better quality optics.

ugyvel


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ugyvel

Another binocular newbie question--our cheap binoculars are zoom 7-15x35. I assume that means our zoom goes to 15 magnification. Why aren't these more expensive and better quality binoculars zoom? Are there trade-offs in getting zoom? Seems like the ability to go much higher in magnification would be a great feature.

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
riverdemon wrote:Here is the best real world advice I can offer.

10x42 are going to be the largest, but they will let in the most light and get you the "closest" to what you are looking at. They hard be hard to keep steady though. I use this magnification at work watching birds on the beach, they work well there but there is a lot of light; when it is bright they are great.

8x42 are going to give you the same magnification as the 10x42, but they let in a little less light, so the image won't be as bright. They are easier to keep steady though. They are a good all around range though, and work well in the woods, backyard, etc. This is the type I own (not the vanguard, different company).

8x32 are the smallest, and have the smallest "zoom". They should have the largest field of view though, which means they will have the biggest viewing area.



Wrong logic on the "42"s. The light GATHERING ability of the aperture--42mm is the same, but the magnification--either 8x or 10x--SPREADS the image more, making it LESS bright as it magnification increases. So the 8x42s will have the brighter(and smaller) of the two images.
Also, unless you're REALLY steady, 10x is pretty tough to hold.


http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm

"Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars."

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
ugyvel wrote:Another binocular newbie question--our cheap binoculars are zoom 7-15x35. I assume that means our zoom goes to 15 magnification. Why aren't these more expensive and better quality binoculars zoom? Are there trade-offs in getting zoom? Seems like the ability to go much higher in magnification would be a great feature.



http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm

"Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be."

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
mschauber wrote:Similar to @pinchecats question, could someone explain what the benefits of the different models are?

I'm used photography equipment, so a translation of binocular #'s into standard glass terms would be greatly appreciated. Or just actual distance these can be used for.

I appreciate the help/lesson.



http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm

gentlax13


quality posts: 1 Private Messages gentlax13


Would these be good for intro stargazing? There was a telescope on here a while back that was refereed to as a hobby killer for beginners and the suggestion was to go with binoculars instead. Would these be good for looking at stars?

tauyeung


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tauyeung

Actually, it is like this...

The exit pupil, which partly determines the amount of light you see, is the objective diameter (42mm) divided by the magnification (10x). This means that the 10x42mm binocular has an exit pupil of 4.2mm. The 8x42mm model has an exit pupil of more than 5mm.

As a result, the 8x42mm produces brighter images. However, the brightness of image is also determined by maximum opening of your pupils. As we age, the maximum pupil opening gets smaller. 4mm to 5mm is typical for adults.

In addition, the limiting factor of the exit pupil and your own maximum pupil opening also depends on the lighting condition. If it is bright outside, everyone has a smaller pupil opening, so the exit pupil of the binocular does not even matter, at all.

The bottom line is that if you will use this at night or in low light situations, get the one with the maximum exit pupil. However, if you will mostly using it during the day with plenty of light, get the one that is easier to transport (lighter).

Hope this is of some help!

riverdemon wrote:Here is the best real world advice I can offer.

10x42 are going to be the largest, but they will let in the most light and get you the "closest" to what you are looking at. They hard be hard to keep steady though. I use this magnification at work watching birds on the beach, they work well there but there is a lot of light; when it is bright they are great.

8x42 are going to give you the same magnification as the 10x42, but they let in a little less light, so the image won't be as bright. They are easier to keep steady though. They are a good all around range though, and work well in the woods, backyard, etc. This is the type I own (not the vanguard, different company).

8x32 are the smallest, and have the smallest "zoom". They should have the largest field of view though, which means they will have the biggest viewing area.



tauyeung


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tauyeung

The 10x model has a 10 times magnification. You can see more stars than you can with bare eyes, for sure. However, you may not be able to see the ring of Saturn, or the red spot of Jupiter.

As another poster mentioned, even at 10x, hand holding it can be an issue. This is especially the case if you have to hand hold it over a long period of time.

gentlax13 wrote:Would these be good for intro stargazing? There was a telescope on here a while back that was refereed to as a hobby killer for beginners and the suggestion was to go with binoculars instead. Would these be good for looking at stars?



tauyeung


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tauyeung

Variable focal length (zoom to the rest of us) requires more complex optics and more individual lenses inside the binocular. As a result, it is actually more difficult to get good results with a zoom model than a fixed power model.

If you are hunting or observing wildlife, the zoom feature can be helpful to locate animals that are moving, then zoom in for more details.

cole103 wrote:http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm

"Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be."



tauyeung


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tauyeung

In general, my own preference of country of origin is German/Japan, then Korea, then China.

However, I have an REI binocular and some other scopes made in China, and the optical quality is not bad for the money. If you need that extra contrast and sharpness for life-or-death situations, such as spotting a sniper from hundreds of yards away, the extra cost of a Japanese or German one is worth it.

Keep in mind that even with products made in China, the actual quality depends on quality control, quality tolerance and many other factors. You can get one really good binocular made in China, you can also get one that is not so great.

charliecarroll wrote:Does country of origin have anything to do with quality?

First, at this price point, this is not a bad deal at all, all things considered.

I was curious so I googled, "Vanguard Spirit Plus Binoculars country of origin" and what I found was these are made in China. When buying it should be known that the quality of optics from China are not up to Japanese standards. Nor are optics from Korea and/or any other far east country. The best optics are from Japan and Germany with German optics almost always being the highest priced.

Long term camera buffs that visit Woot (and it seems there are quite a few) can attest to the fact that one of the most used "bait and switch' tactics of unscrupulous camera dealers (that almost all sell other optics as well) would advertise and offer a well known brand name at a ridiculously low price. When you called them to place an order you were told, "sorry we have sold out but we have another brand that retails for more and is better and we will let you have it for the same lower price!" How nice. No, not nice. You were baited and you called. They made the offer and if you said yes, the switch had been made. When you received your new lens, binoculars, etc., you looked and there was the surprise. Made in Korea or made in China.

Again, this is not to say this offer is a bad deal as long as you are aware the optical quality is not going to be what a good set of binoculars (same or similar specs) from a Japanese manufacturer are going to be. You will none the less pay a little more but you will be getting better quality optics.



tauyeung


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tauyeung

Given that you maximum pupil opening is more than 5mm, the 8x42 is brighter (42/8 > 42/10) than the 10x42. The magnification difference between an 8x and a 10x is not that significant for most people.

The 8x also has a wider field/angle of vision.

Edit: I just realized that the 8x42 model also has a longer eye relief of 19mm. This means it is a better model for people (like myself) who wear glasses. If you can take off your glasses when using a pair of binoculars, you don't need the long eye relief. However, if you need your glasses when using a pair of binoculars, a long eye relief is a must!

slickk23 wrote:Actually the magnification in the 8x42 is less than the 10x42, but they should have equal brightness.



mschauber


quality posts: 40 Private Messages mschauber

Thank you to all that have shared their knowledge. It's truly appreciated and makes buying from a place like woot a much better experience than buying from almost any other online store.

--
Hey you, out there in the cold; Getting lonely, getting old; Can you feel me? - Pink Floyd/Roger Waters
My CT

pinchecat


quality posts: 20 Private Messages pinchecat

yo does someone care to answer my question about which ones are more appropriate for viewing sporting events from the stands? i'm talking about wanting to see 22 players at the line of scrimmage rather than one dude's jock strap through his britches.

mschauber


quality posts: 40 Private Messages mschauber

Ok, so here's my question. After the rebate, these are going to be $100 plus s/h & tax, about $17 for me (and of course who knows how long it will take to actually get the rebate.)

If I'm only going to buy one pair of binoculars, would I be better off spending a little more and getting Nikon glass (all of my photography lenses are Nikkor) or do the differences not justify the added cost?
http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-7541-Monarch-10x42-Binocular/dp/B005KG3U92?ie=UTF8&tag=dealswoot-20&camp=211189&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005KG3U92
10x42 = $200 + tax
8x42 = $179 + tax
Technical Specs:


  • Focusing System – Center Focus
  • Magnification – 8x or 10x
  • Objective Diameter (mm) – 42
  • FOV @ 1000 yds – 299 to 330 ft
  • Close Focus Distance (ft) – 9.8
  • Exit Pupil (mm) – 4.2
  • Eye Relief (mm) – 17.4 to 24.1
  • Waterproof/Fogproof – Yes
  • Prism coating – High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms
  • High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms - helps eliminate the degradation of the image caused by different light phases reflecting in the binocular.
  • Fully Multicoated - all lens surfaces are multicoated with anti-reflective coatings
  • Polycarbonate Body - designed to be rugged and durable
  • Multi-click Turn and Slide Eyecups with generous eye relief - great for eyeglass wearers
  • Unmatched Warranty - 25 year No Fault repair or replace warranty


BTW, I do wear glasses. From this woot offer, I was leaning towards the 10x42 as they are the same weight and size as the 8x42 and I will be using them mostly during the day and if it's at night, there is so much ambient light in NYC, you can barely call it dark.

For me choosing a product doesn't always come down to the least expensive. I don't want to have to replace these for a long time, if ever. They are replacing a cheap pair I've had for almost 30 years which are like 3.5x30 and cheap plastic.

Any advice or suggestions are appreciated. I didn't do much searching, this Nikon was the 2nd item I pulled up in my search.

--
Hey you, out there in the cold; Getting lonely, getting old; Can you feel me? - Pink Floyd/Roger Waters
My CT

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
pinchecat wrote:yo does someone care to answer my question about which ones are more appropriate for viewing sporting events from the stands? i'm talking about wanting to see 22 players at the line of scrimmage rather than one dude's jock strap through his britches.



http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm

You're going to want a wider field of view, so, out of these choices, the 8x36---less to carry around, too!

acanarelli


quality posts: 225 Private Messages acanarelli
gentlax13 wrote:Would these be good for intro stargazing? There was a telescope on here a while back that was refereed to as a hobby killer for beginners and the suggestion was to go with binoculars instead. Would these be good for looking at stars?



While these binoculars are an improvement over viewing with the naked eye alone, there are other issues which make these binoculars a poor selection for stargazing. Making the image appear 10 times larger than it actually is will make the image seem to bounce as the binoculars respond to the slightest movement of your hands and arms as they are holding the binoculars. You just can not hold them steady enough to get a pleasing image and after a while you just give up in defeat.

If you want a good pair of binoculars for stargazing, you will also need a means of mounting the binoculars to insure a degree of stability. Some of these mounts become very large, very cumbersome and very expensive. If stargazing is your goal, you are better off looking at a fair to good telescope (a 6" SCT is a good candidate) with a solid equatorial mount. The price tag for this type of setup is about $1,000...but it will last a lifetime.

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
mschauber wrote:Ok, so here's my question. After the rebate, these are going to be $100 plus s/h & tax, about $17 for me (and of course who knows how long it will take to actually get the rebate.)

If I'm only going to buy one pair of binoculars, would I be better off spending a little more and getting Nikon glass (all of my photography lenses are Nikkor) or do the differences not justify the added cost?
http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-7541-Monarch-10x42-Binocular/dp/B005KG3U92?ie=UTF8&tag=dealswoot-20&camp=211189&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B005KG3U92
10x42 = $200 + tax
8x42 = $179 + tax
Technical Specs:

  • Focusing System – Center Focus
  • Magnification – 8x or 10x
  • Objective Diameter (mm) – 42
  • FOV @ 1000 yds – 299 to 330 ft
  • Close Focus Distance (ft) – 9.8
  • Exit Pupil (mm) – 4.2
  • Eye Relief (mm) – 17.4 to 24.1
  • Waterproof/Fogproof – Yes
  • Prism coating – High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms
  • High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms - helps eliminate the degradation of the image caused by different light phases reflecting in the binocular.
  • Fully Multicoated - all lens surfaces are multicoated with anti-reflective coatings
  • Polycarbonate Body - designed to be rugged and durable
  • Multi-click Turn and Slide Eyecups with generous eye relief - great for eyeglass wearers
  • Unmatched Warranty - 25 year No Fault repair or replace warranty


BTW, I do wear glasses. From this woot offer, I was leaning towards the 10x42 as they are the same weight and size as the 8x42 and I will be using them mostly during the day and if it's at night, there is so much ambient light in NYC, you can barely call it dark.

For me choosing a product doesn't always come down to the least expensive. I don't want to have to replace these for a long time, if ever. They are replacing a cheap pair I've had for almost 30 years which are like 3.5x30 and cheap plastic.

Any advice or suggestions are appreciated. I didn't do much searching, this Nikon was the 2nd item I pulled up in my search.



First, if you wear glasses, you don't want the 10x42s, the eye relief will drive you nuts, the 8x42s will be much better and you really won't miss the extra magnification. (Actually you might want to look through a pair of 7x50s some time for a comparison...) Realize that even the military doesn't use 10x binocs--too hard to hold steady.
Second---quality versus price. This is a truly difficult question. I have been in astronomy and outdoor stuff all my life and today is the 1st time I've ever heard of Vanguard binocs. They may be really good, the "buy of the century", but I'm always a little suspect. If they ar going to be something you're going to depend on for the rest of your life, if you make your business with them---then I would want to actually LOOK through the models before I'd EVER pick one out. If they're going into a box in the back of your closet, only to see daylight a couple of times a year, then these should be fine. You know the difference that glass can make---from experience I can say that it makes EVEN MORE difference in a binoc than in a camera lens. A buddy had a nice set of Nikons that were so vivid they were almost 3D. I know it doesn't help much right now, but please sometime go look through some REAL top notch binocs before you jump into a decision. Swarowski, Nikon, Pentax, Steiner, Zeiss, Bushnell. You won't be sorry, the difference is amazing---maybe not affordable, but amazing.

icemanforlife


quality posts: 3 Private Messages icemanforlife
gentlax13 wrote:Would these be good for intro stargazing? There was a telescope on here a while back that was refereed to as a hobby killer for beginners and the suggestion was to go with binoculars instead. Would these be good for looking at stars?



I just bought these for 50 dollars for sky gazing. they have amazing reviews and are on sale. http://www.amazon.com/Celestron-SkyMaster-Binoculars-Tripod-Adapter/dp/B00008Y0VN/ref=pd_sim_p_1

mschauber


quality posts: 40 Private Messages mschauber
cole103 wrote:First, if you wear glasses, you don't want the 10x42s, the eye relief will drive you nuts, the 8x42s will be much better and you really won't miss the extra magnification. (Actually you might want to look through a pair of 7x50s some time for a comparison...) Realize that even the military doesn't use 10x binocs--too hard to hold steady.
Second---quality versus price. This is a truly difficult question. I have been in astronomy and outdoor stuff all my life and today is the 1st time I've ever heard of Vanguard binocs. They may be really good, the "buy of the century", but I'm always a little suspect. If they ar going to be something you're going to depend on for the rest of your life, if you make your business with them---then I would want to actually LOOK through the models before I'd EVER pick one out. If they're going into a box in the back of your closet, only to see daylight a couple of times a year, then these should be fine. You know the difference that glass can make---from experience I can say that it makes EVEN MORE difference in a binoc than in a camera lens. A buddy had a nice set of Nikons that were so vivid they were almost 3D. I know it doesn't help much right now, but please sometime go look through some REAL top notch binocs before you jump into a decision. Swarowski, Nikon, Pentax, Steiner, Zeiss, Bushnell. You won't be sorry, the difference is amazing---maybe not affordable, but amazing.



I'm going to take your suggestion and head over to B&H Photo and let my eyes decide. I was going to jump on these b/c of what seemed like a good buy, but the more I thought about it, it's not cheap if they end up sitting around. I've bought 1 too many Woots that take up more space than they are useful.

I really appreciate your advice and the info you gave me!

--
Hey you, out there in the cold; Getting lonely, getting old; Can you feel me? - Pink Floyd/Roger Waters
My CT

riverdemon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages riverdemon

Thanks for setting me straight, I was on the first cup of coffee this morning with a five year old in the background. I won't edit my first post, as I deserve the flak.

These days, like most other things, off brand binoculars with all the high end features (bak4 prisms, HD coatings, etc) are being made in China. Even low end Nikon and Canon binoculars (among others) are made in China now. Chinese made optics do not match Swarovski, Zeiss, and some of the other high end ones, but they have most of the same optical features of those high end ones, and will give you a good image. And it doesn't matter if you have a $200 pair or a $1,000 pair, drop them in the sand or don't take care of them, they are done. Checking them out in a store is great advice.

As for the type, 10x42 can be pretty shaky, even in high light. I use them for work looking at shorebirds. Bright sun, with sun reflecting off the water and sand. And, I usually have a spotting scope with me as well if I need a steady image. the binoculars are for speed. I really like my 8x42's, great for all around use.

schorert


quality posts: 4 Private Messages schorert
pinchecat wrote:yo does someone care to answer my question about which ones are more appropriate for viewing sporting events from the stands? i'm talking about wanting to see 22 players at the line of scrimmage rather than one dude's jock strap through his britches.



For the 10x42 The field of view at 1000 yards is about 300ft. Use this figure to determine the diameter of the image at your estimated range. If you're 150yds from the field, the FOV is going to be about 45ft. The 8x might be better as the FOV is 6ft wider at 150 yards. I don't know why if the magnification on the 1042 is 25% more powerful that the FOV isn't 25% smaller...some brainiac can explain I'm sure...

0rion5


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 0rion5

"8x42 are going to give you the same magnification as the 10x42, but they let in a little less light"

Actually, that's backwards. Same objective size (same light gathering), lower magnification.